Reflexology Paths

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Boulder Reflexology Path
Boulder Reflexology Path
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Boulder Reflexology Path
Boulder Reflexology Path
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What is Reflexology

 

Reflexology is an ancient form of therapy used in China and Egypt as early as 4000 B.C.  Via the application of pressure to the feet and hands neurological reflex zones associated with different organ or body systems are therapeutically stimulated.  This supports overall health by relaxing, integrating, and balancing both body and mind.

 

What is a Reflexology Path?

 

Reflexology paths are walking paths made of smooth river rocks turned on edge and closely packed together, usually embedded in a concrete substrate.  Not only does walking on the path provide health benefits, the artistic designs and mosaics created using a variety of sizes and colors adds aesthetically to any yard or public space.

These paths are common in parks all over Asia, and act as an integral part of many people’s self-care routine.  Here in the United States reflexology paths are much less common, but do exist.  Interest seems to be growing as more and more paths spring up in spas and parks across the country.

 

Heath Benefits
  • Reduce tension

  • Improve balance

  • Ground

  • Improve circulation to the body and brain

  • Strengthen your immune system

  • Improve digestion

  • Improve mental acuity

  • Increase foot and ankle flexibility

  • Increase strength in the feet, ankles, and legs

 

recent study conducted at the Oregon Research Institute (ORI) concluded that walking on a path 30 minutes per day for 16 weeks resulted in significant reduction in blood pressure, and improvement in balance and physical performance.

 

Individuals walking on a well constructed path naturally are brought into the present moment as it is next to impossible, especially for beginners, to walk on the path without paying attention to each step moment to moment.  So it is a platform for deepening meditation as well, walking or otherwise.

 
Grounding

 

A new health movement called “Grounding or Earthing” suggests our bodies are greatly supported by coming into direct contact with the Earth on a regular basis.   Direct contact with the negatively charged ground can help protect us from the constant exposure to electromagnetic frequencies (EMFs), that are prevalent in our modern culture.  Additionally, experts in this new field suggest that continuous contact with the earth increases our capacity for self healing.  Emerging research shows “grounding” to be beneficial in reducing inflammation, reducing chronic pain, improving sleep, increasing energy or life force/chi, and reducing muscular tension and headaches. Visit www.earthing.com/what-is-earthing/ or www.Grounded.com for more information.

 

Tips on how to use a  Reflexology Path
  • Try it barefoot or with socks

  • Take your time, walk slowly and mindfully

  • Don’t force yourself if you feel pain

  • Take small breaks, sit down and massage your feet

  • Increase the length of time you walk each session, and try to walk routinely

  • Pay attention to your breath as you walk, and work to deepen it, breathing into different parts of your body.

  • Note where it is painful and try to work on that area the next time.

  • Utilize the foot reflexology chart/map to work on specific areas of your body that need attention and care.

  • You can try walking on your heels, front foot, or you can gently work with the sides of your feet.